School technology adoption: harness the power within…

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Educational technology has never been more popular or accessible but remarkably, some school leaders completely misunderstand the change in pedagogical approach a deeply embedded adoption of technology requires.  It is all to common to see schools buy the tech, then pay one of the many ‘Edtech Guru’ consultants an astronomical fee for a day or two’s consultation and expect learning to be transformed over night. However, a far more comprehensive plan is required if adoption is to be successful. Furthermore, utilising the endless talent, wisdom and experience contained within every staff room should feature heavily within it.

School leaders must comprehend that the simple acquisition of digital technologies will not lead to inevitable change and progression. Indeed, as  Keith Turvey from Brighton University states; if technology-centered arguments, as opposed to those based on pedagogy, are the focus of school leaders attention then technology may never perform more than a “perfunctory role in education”.

Instead, school leaders must realize that it is their responsibility to ensure the conditions are right for a variety of stakeholders to be actively and passionately involved in the integration of technology into their respective school context. School leaders need to consider the myriad of complexities involved with digital technology adoption and reflect upon the multifaceted barriers that they will encounter.

There is plenty of highly respected academic literature that indicates successful modern school leadership requires the acquisition of new skills, new behaviours, new knowledge and indeed, new vision. All of which are fundamentally necessary if educational technology is to become an indispensable element of a school and it’s endless potential is fully unraveled.

It is my opinion therefore, that schools who wish to succeed in the digital age must ensure that they employ and nurture leadership that understands the possibilities that technology can offer but also grasps the difficulties successful adoption involves.

School leaders need to accept that no educational system should be regarded as a single social system. Rather, each individual school has it’s own idiosyncrasies, identities and teachers. An ill-considered adventure in the technological jungle, without considering existing school culture would be foolish. Therefore, school leaders wishing to adopt technology should engage in open and frank dialogue with their staff about mutual goals and visions for their respective schools. The value of such conversations should not be underestimated and are a powerful means to evoke and address our fundamental beliefs. As Linda Lambert puts it “Being listened to and listening to others has an almost magical effect on our expressions as a professional”.

With such dialogue taking place, the development of shared purpose may contribute to the organisations ability to adopt and integrate new technologies. It would also provide teachers with opportunities to continuously learn from each other, and wider professional networks, and put into practice the new powers, knowledge and skills they have acquired.

Ultimately, if school leaders wish to provide the best possible learning opportunities for their students, and see the adoption of technology as part of that process, they must also ensure that they provide the best possible circumstances for their teachers to pioneer, experiment, make mistakes and learn together.

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Get Kahooting!

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If you haven’t already heard of Kahoot, it really is worth investigating. The online quiz creator is one of the best free tools available to teachers to add a new engaging, simple-to-use but brilliantly fun dimension into your everyday teaching.

Teacher Perspective

Getting started is easy. Sign up for an account at https://getkahoot.com/ and once this is established, you click on the New Kahoot button or choose between a quiz, discussion or survey.

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Whatever option you select, you will be redirected to the same screen. There is no difference in the set up for a quiz, discussion or survey, rather you will need to pose the questions in a different way. The next screen you come to will look like this:

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It’s pretty simple to fill in and one really nice feature is the ability to add an intro video. Basically, the YouTube video that you choose will play in a loop whilst the players of the game sign up. Therefore, I would recommend the video is not too long. You could even upload your own videos to YouTube to use!

Once the Description page is completed, you start entering your questions. A really helpful feature is that you can add a picture or video to accompany each question. This could just be a visual prompt or actually form part of the question as shown in the example below:

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You then set the rest of your questions and once finished save your Kahoot, ready to be played.

This can be done by hitting the play button. Once it has been clicked, a pin number will be automatically generated and appear on the class projector.

This is the pin the children need to join the game!play

Pupil Perspective

It could not be any easier for pupils to join the game. They simply need to visit www.kahoot.it and they will see this screen:

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To join the game, all they need to do is add the teacher generated pin code and a nickname! Any silly names can be easily deleted along with the player who entered them. Children soon learn they are missing out on a whole lot of fun!

CPD

Kahoot very helpfully has a whole webpage dedicated to CPD resources! It includes a slideshow available in PDF, PowerPoint or Keynote format, and even has some speaker notes with guidance and prompts!

Get Kahoot

I could not recommend Kahoot enough. I love writing the quizzes and children absolutely love playing them. It’s a simple but sure-fired way to get ALL your class involved in the lesson and motivate them to achieve whilst you get to monitor their knowledge and understanding of any part of the curriculum you choose to use.

 

 

 

Berlin Takeaway – ADE Institute 2016

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Berlin is a city abound with character, history, contrast and wonder. This year Apple chose it to host the 2016 the Global Apple Distinguished Educator Institute. The week was quite brilliant and I’d like to share five things that I took away from a remarkable experience

1. Technology can break down walls

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Perhaps there is no other city in the world in which a wall has played such a prominent part in defining culture. The Berlin Wall was torn down over 25 years ago and it’s citizens now enjoy freedom of movement, ideology and expression. In a classroom, when used with well-planned instruction, technology has the power to unite classrooms, empower and amaze students and help turn teachers into global authors. Indeed, at the Apple Institute, educators from every corner of the planet joined together with a common goal – to use technology to change the lives of their students. From having breakfast with Brazilian ADE’s to working with ADE’s from the Middle East on global projects; the ADE institute highlighted that we are all truly global citizens and education is a force for good.

2. Swift Playgrounds has a LOT of potential

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Apple, like many other technology companies, believe that coding is an essential skill and will only become more and more important in our evermore technology focused society. They have come up with a new iPad App called Swift Playgrounds that makes getting started with coding fun, interactive and achievable. The APP is released in fall  Autumn but to get a good idea of what to expect, Apple have released an iBook guide for teachers. 

3. Running/walking is the best way to feel a city

IMG_3683A couple of runs in Berlin provided an opportunity to see parts of the city that were off the beaten track. The first was an early morning, 9mile adventure with Nathan Ashman. The second, a 6 mile random odyssey towards the Lichtenberg area of town. On the Wednesday, all ADE’s were given the opportunity to explore Berlin. Mark Anderson, Coby Reynolds and myself set off by foot to find the East Side Gallery. We roughly followed the path of the Wall from the Brandenburg Gate until we reached our destination. We filmed, took pictures, grabbed a couple of beers and sampled some local food – good times and great memories.

4. Photography is for everybody

eyeem-homeWe were fortunate enough to listen to a fascinating seminar from the team behind the App – EyeEm. The App is used by 18million people from 150 countries across the globe. Any image that you are particularly proud of can be uploaded and shared with The World. The quality of imagery is exceptional and you even get a chance to make a little cash out of it as brands like UBER, The Huffington Post and ASOS may want to buy them! Fellow ADE Rachel Smith had already been tapped up by Getty Images! The seminar also included some top photography tips and with the remarkable technology that is readily accessible to people, most people can get a shot that was once only available to the elite.

5. Virtual reality works in the classroom

IMG_3663Perhaps the greatest thing about the ADE institute is the humbling experience of seeing the amazing work that goes on in schools around the world. I take my hat off to every single one of the ADE’s who present a three minute showcase and I never fail to take home a list of things that I have to try in my classroom. After ADE2016, very near the top of the list is Virtual Reality (VR). Like some elements of photography and film-making, only a few years ago using VR in the classroom would have been obscenely expensive, time consuming and impractical. However, after seeing some of the work done by educators such as Sarah Jones and Nathan Ashman using affordable tools like Google Cardboard, Streetview and Thinglink 36o, I am excited about getting some projects started in the next school year.

 

 

Local Knowledge – iPad Project For The Classroom

Local Knowledge - Building Community by John Jones

Click on the picture to access the course

No matter where you live, there will inevitably a myriad of local stories in addition to places and people of great interest. However, it is not uncommon for local people to actually know very little about the secrets surrounding their locality. Indeed, this tendency is even more likely amongst younger citizens.

This iTunesU course, Local Knowledge – Building Community, is designed to break the trend and allow students to develop a deeper understanding and connection with their neighbourhood. It also should result in other citizens accessing the content that the students create so in turn, their appreciation of the wonders of their community are developed and enhanced.

The project is based around the concept of Challenge Based Learning and allows students to complete a range of engaging and meaningful activities based around the Big Idea of Community. The course is not about a specific app. It is designed to utilise digital technology, specifically the iPad to enhance instructional practice. I would really appreciate feedback in the comments section below from anyone who downloads runs the course with their students.

 

A Season To Remember…

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The Charlton Athletic 2015-2016 season will long be remembered, but for all the wrong reasons. Three managers, a toothless battle against relegation and continuing mass protests only tell a small part of the throughly depressing downfall of a famous old, once proud – now poisoned, football club in South East London.

The Duchâtelet regime has made the football club almost unrecognisable from the club I grew up supporting. The very thing that made Charlton Charlton has gone – the soul has been ripped away from the club and, unless there is radical change, is in very real danger of disappearing into the abyss for ever.

The miserable plight of Charlton has become increasingly well documented. The fallout from the Brighton match was well-covered by Football on Five, indeed both Chris Powell and Chris Iwelumo featured as guests; expressing their deep concern for the future of Charlton. Furthermore, a recent on-point and well articulated article by Barney Ronay in the Guardian highlighted the ignorant and arrogant destruction of Charlton by our classless and repugnant owner and CEO, Roland Duchâtelet and Katrien Meire.

Brighton and Blackpool fans join in the protests.

Brighton and Blackpool fans join in the protests.

However, despite the ongoing tragedy, Saturday was a day to be proud of and will be memorable for the right reasons. Yet again, CARD did a superb job in organising a mass protest in which an estimated 6000 people took part. There were banners, balloons and beachballs and the game became a mere sideshow as the fans made their incandescent feelings towards the hapless board known once more. Moreover, the accompanying Brighton fans were absolutely brilliant. Thousands joined in the protest before the game and during the match could be heard singing anti-Roland songs. Some even joined the after-match protest to huge ovation and appreciation from the Addicks faithful.

As it stands, unless things change, I hold no hope at all for next season; time and time again the regime has proved itself clueless and incompetent and this shows no sign of changing.  There have been hopeful murmurs of Lennie Lawrence, Paul Elliot (and even David Beckham!); knights in white armour riding into SE7 to save us. However, until the Belgian contingent leave us the hell alone, I fear that next season may bring even darker times upon my beloved but beleaguered Charlton Athletic.

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The Success of a School iPad Project – Pupil, Teacher & Parent Voice

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Has our iPad deployment worked? A simple question, but one that is often very hard to answer. There is no doubt that technology offers many means of improving teaching and learning in the classroom; the results of our recent pupil survey certainly reiterated this. However, as any technology deployment is unlikely to suddenly provide all pupils with 11 A* at GCSE, how do you truly measure success?

Ready_for_final_exam_at_Norwegian_University_of_Science_and_TechnologyPersonally, I don’t believe that success should be judged by a set of test results, but those that do will tell you technology is an expensive waste of time as there is no evidence it impacts upon ‘standards’. Simply, they are wrong. I am fortunate enough to work at a school where independent thinking and a love of learning are just as important as great grades and standards of all-types are valued.

Over the previous two years we had made considerable investment in the procurement of whole-school holistic WiFi. The Y6 iPad roll out in September 2015 was the culmination of many months of planning, training and decision making that had ultimate the goal of improving the classroom experience of our pupils; allowing them to do things differently and express themselves in a multitude of ways.

Eight months into the project, and with September 2016 fast approaching, it has been a time to reflect on both the successes (and failures) as we make preparations for the second phase of the deployment. We recently held an iPad information evening for prospective Year Six parents whose children are in the second year of our roll out. Therefore we compiled these two short films and completed a qualitative survey of parents to demonstrate the success of our 1:2:1 project so far from those who have experienced it first hand. The results speak for themselves.

Pupil Voice:

 

Teacher Voice:

Parent Voice:

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App Spotlight – Adobe Post

Nowadays, you see Social Graphics everywhere. Facebook and Twitter are literally littered with them. From humorous or political MEMEs, to nauseating quotes about true love; for the average digital citizen they are nigh-on impossible to escape from.

So rather than try to avoid these pieces of digital-dialogue, I would actually encourage educators to start creating their own with the fantastic free APP, Adobe Post – there are a myriad of ways in which they can be used at school and beyond!

Once downloaded, you can select from a variety of ready made ‘Posts’ from the Inspiration Wall generated by Adobe. You can simply to choose to explore and remix those or even better, create your very own truly unique masterpiece.

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Some of the ready made Posts that you can choose.

You hit the large green ‘plus’ sign at the bottom of the screen to get started.

You can then choose between a wide selection of design options surrounding the image you use for your picture. The APP comes pre-loaded with access to some fantastic copyright free images, or of course, you can add your own from the camera-roll or instantly take one from the iPad/iPhone camera.

Once you have selected your image, Adobe Post starts to get clever. The App will automatically select a design that suits the image. It’ll select a font, colour scheme and text size to match the image and so far I have been pretty impressed with the in-App choices! However, if you disagree with the artistic preferences of the app, you have a selection of customisable choices to  choose from.  You can manipulate layouts, colour, font, typography styles, shapes, alignment, opacity and even the spacing.

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The customise options within the App allow creativity

You also have a wide selection of gorgeous designs and palettes to choose from. There is even an in-App photo-editor that allows you to filter your picture too perfectly compliment your design and text.FullSizeRender 2

Furthermore, you are not limited to one text box; you can add as many as required to complete your graphic in the way that you envisaged. No design experience is required to create stunning social graphics in seconds.

So, how can Adobe Post be used by teachers and students?

  • Speech and language play
  • Classroom posters and displays
  • Sight words proficiency
  • Narrative prompts
  • Rhyming game
  • Playing with shapes and colors
  • Second language acquisition
  • Story starters
  • Creative storytelling
  • Book covers
  • Advertising events (CPD, debates, sports fixtures etc.)
  • Photo essays
  • Class reports and blogs
  • Trip reports
  • Science fair presentations
  • Student portfolios
  • Classroom newsletters
  • Game updates
  • School and district reports
  • PTA ads and promos

Please find below some examples from school:

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There is no reason why  can’t become a incredibly useful (and simple to use) addition to the iPad classroom toolbox. Indeed, if you need some further inspiration – check out The Adobe Education Community who frequently share ideas and classroom uses on the Adobe Education Exchange site.